Category Archives: Natural Stream

Rocky Mountain Spring Water

While attempting to climb Argentine Peak in Colorado, I happened upon this stream flowing with the purest of pure natural water. It is the headwaters of South Clear Creek, which flows down into Clear Creek and through Golden. Golden is where the original Coors brewery is located. I’m not sure if they get their water directly from Clear Creek, but if they do, some of this water may end up in a can of their beer.

I didn’t start hiking until after 1:00 PM, normally a bad idea due to afternoon thunderstorms. I’m just not a morning person. I also knew that the weather pattern was stable with little chance of a thunderstorm. I didn’t really care if I made it to the 13,738 feet summit of Argentine Peak, I just wanted some natural high-country therapy. I made it up to about 13,150 feet, but it was close to 4:00 PM. It was a Sunday and I’m not as gung-ho as I used to be. Nowadays, I’m more concerned about being in the moment to fully experience the mountains. I had headlamps with me, but descending in the dark is still challenging. It is much harder when you can only see a few feet in front of you.

This part of Colorado had two heavy snowfalls in late May that made the snowpack incredible. I traversed across at least 10 snowfields and was happy to have an ice ax with me. A lot of the snow will survive the summer.

There were many hikers on the trail between the lakes, but nobody was around at the 12,000 feet plus elevation. I was elated. When I go to the mountains I want to experience nature by myself or with a friend. I live and work in the busy Front Range of Colorado, an area of nearly non-stop population growth and development. To renew myself mentally, I need to have an experience like this one on a regular basis. Once I’m on the trail hiking, I block out the stress and focus on “being” in the mountains.

I work as a stream restoration engineer, so I am particularly fascinated by streams, hydrology, snow, rainfall, and the physical forces at work. With streams, gravity is the primary force at work. On this hike, I took several photos showing the birthplace of South Clear Creek. There are many people who don’t know where or how a river starts. One day someone asked me what the origin of a river looks like. I may work that into a future presentation or article. I’m sure there are millions of people who have never seen natural water as clear as this stream water. I don’t recommend drinking water from streams, but I drank from this stream. It was flowing out from under a snowfield from within 50 feet of where I stopped. Even then, the water could have some undesirable additives from marmots.

I like standing on new high points, but it didn’t bother me to stop short of this summit. I knew I could have made it to the top of Argentine Peak, but then I would have been rushed on the way down. It felt great to hike back at a leisurely pace. I took a 30-minute rest stop by Silver Dollar Lake to let my socks dry out. My life had balance again.

Best wishes on your adventures in life.

 

Headwaters of South Clear Creek

Headwaters of South Clear Creek at an elevation of 12,500 feet. (June 25, 2017, TJ Burr)

Murray Lake and Snowpack

This photo shows Murray Lake (closest), Naylor Lake (lower), and Silver Dollar Lake (barely visible on right). The two high peaks in the distance are Mt. Evans and Beirstadt, both Fourteeners. (June 25, 2017, TJ Burr)

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